Toronto Police to conduct “enforcement blitz” on October 26th to remind drivers of new law

tpolice-newsThere has been a number of studies done about the upcoming Ontario ban of using hand-held devices while driving.

You know it’s getting serious and close to the date when the Police get involved. To ensure everyone is aware, Toronto Police have issued a statement reminding motorists of the new law goes into effect on Monday, October 26, 2009. To celebrate this great news they’ll be “conducting an enforcement blitz aimed at warnings, however, motorists should be aware that officers will maintain discretion in laying charges.”

So make sure you go out and get yourself a Bluetooth headset. If you’re caught you could face a fine of up to $500. Here’s the gentle Police reminder:

“The Toronto Police Service would like to remind motorists that, effective Monday, October 26, 2009, it will be illegal in Ontario for drivers to use any electronic devices that can cause distraction.

The new law will make it illegal for drivers to talk, text, type, dial or e−mail using hand−held cellphones and other hand−held communications and entertainment devices. As of this date, and up to February 1, 2010, there will be a three−month education period where police officers will not issue tickets.

On Monday, October 26, 2009, police will be conducting an enforcement blitz aimed at warnings, however, motorists should be aware that officers will maintain discretion in laying charges.

Police continue to have the ability to lay charges of Careless Driving or other offences under the Highway Traffic Act or Criminal Code driving offences, for situations where drivers are using electronic devices. This new legislation will enhance traffic safety by creating a specific offence for driving behaviour which is known to distract drivers from driving safely. Distracted drivers are a safety risk to themselves and others. The Toronto Police Service is committed to ensuring the safety of all motorists.

Police, paramedics and firefighters will continue to be allowed to use hand−held devices when performing their duties. All drivers may continue to use hand−held devices to call 9−1−1 in an emergency situation.”

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